Collge of Design, Construction & Planning
HP at UF

History of Historic Preservation at the University of Florida

In 1968 Professor Blair Reeves, FAIA, introduced architectural preservation studies at the University of Florida, being one of the first schools in the nation to initiate historic preservation coursework. From 1970 to 1989, the School of Architecture offered preservation studies as an option within the graduate program in architecture. During these years, the University of Florida College of Architecture, now the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, gained a national reputation as a leader in preservation education.

Professor Reeves, who continues as advisor to preservation studies in the College, has received the most distinguished awards in the field of preservation, including the Louise Dupont Crowninshield Award in 1988 and the Department of the Interior Conservation Service Award in 1987. He has been a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT) and a field team supervisory architect for summer projects of the Historic American Buildings Survey from 1958-1971.

In 1971, Carl Feiss, FAIA, AIP joined the University of Florida to establish a graduate program in Urban and Regional Planning; he contributed to preservation studies in the College until his retirement. Feiss was a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, technical director and co-author of With Heritage So Rich, contributor to the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, and was internationally recognized as a consultant on historic preservation planning.

In 1972, Professor Reeves joined forces with Walter Beinecke, Jr., preservation oriented developer and entrepreneur, to establish the Preservation Institute: Nantucket (PI:N) as a program of the University of Florida. This program remains a dynamic force in preservation education for students from this university, across the nation, and from international bases. Influenced by this program, in 1982 Professor George Scheffer established the Preservation Institute: Caribbean (PI:C) in cooperation with the International Council on Monuments and Sites, CARIMOS, and local sponsors across the Caribbean Basin.

The Research and Education Center for Architectural Preservation was authorized by the Florida Legislature and approved in 1978 by the State University System of Florida. RECAP would establish a multi-disciplinary preservation forum of academic units across the University; conduct sponsored research projects to provide assistance to communities and educational opportunities for students; and offer workshops on architectural preservation for a broad spectrum of preservation-related professionals.

In 1989, the School of Architecture began to offer, in addition to the professional architecture degree, a Master of Science in Architectural Studies with an optional specialization in historic preservation. Professor Herschel Shepard, FAIA, widely recognized for his preservation architecture including restoration of the historic capitol of the State of Florida, developed a series of preservation technology courses as a core of this program.

In 2003 Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA, was named distinguished Beinecke-Reeves Chair in Historic Preservation and Director of Preservation Programs for the College of Design, Construction, and Planning. In the Spring of 2004, the College Historic Preservation Program Committee initiated the Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation (ICCHP) for graduate students in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning and, utlimately, for graduate students in other academic programs across the University. Faculty and graduate students in Architecture, Building Construction, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Planning, and the Ph.D. Program now participate in this forward moving interdisciplinary specialization in preservation.

In Fall 2005, Museum Studies in the College of Fine Arts joined the ICCHP; explaining the program outside of DCP. Faculty and graduate students in Architecture, Building Construction, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Planning, DCP Ph.D., Museum Studies and Tourism now paticipate in this forward moving interdisciplinary specialization in preservation.

In Fall 2008, DCP added the Master in Historic Preservation.